Formula 1 Circuits

Formula 1 Circuits
I have watched & followed Formula 1 for years, however whenever the chance arises to visit one of the famous old circuits or one of the newer ones making the effort really isn’t a problem. I have even got the wife into coming with me. I’m sure this section will build with time, but an insight to each of the cities and circuits we visit is the plan.

Italy – Circuit of Monza
With a huge crowd of passionate Tifosi cheering for Ferrari and a large international contingent, this is one of the season’s most cherished and evocative races. The refined beauty of Lake Como lies just to the north, and the fashion and cultural riches of nearby Milan make the Italian Grand Prix a superb event.

Monza, the Temple of Speed, is the quickest circuit on the Formula 1 calendar; a breathtaking sprint around the long straights that scythes its way through the Royal Woodland setting, is interrupted only by a handful of chicanes and high speed corners. Monza has been an integral part of Formula 1 since its inception in 1950, and its rich history makes it the personification of the sport according to many.

Singapore – Marina Bay Street Circuit
In 2008 Singapore had the honour of hosting the first night-time event in Formula One history. The inaugural Singapore Grand Prix proved a huge hit, staged on a new street circuit, with the city’s famous skyline providing a truly spectacular backdrop.

The race was announced in May 2007 following the agreement of a five-year deal between Formula One Management CEO Bernie Ecclestone, Singapore entrepreneur Mr Ong Beng Seng, and the Singapore Tourism Board.It instantly established itself as one of the most dramatic and atmospheric races on the calendar. The timing of the event also means it can be broadcast at a convenient time for European television audiences as well as thrilling local fans.

Using public roads around the Marina Bay area, the circuit utilises powerful lighting systems to replicate daylight conditions and the most stringent safety protocols ensure driver and spectator safety.

Grandstand seating and hospitality areas lining the track can accommodate more than 80,000 spectators, while a permanent pit area with deluxe paddock facilities is located adjacent to the Singapore Flyer complex.

 Great Britain – Silverstone

To follow…

Monaco – Circuit of Monte Carlo
No race or circuit of the Formula 1 Calendar can truly match the excellence, the glamour and the challenge of the Monaco Grand Prix. From Casino Square to the World’s most famous Hairpin, through the tunnel and past the luxurious yachts, Monte Carlo is a circuit of legendary corners full of history.

Extremely challenging for both teams and drivers, the narrow circuit through the glamorous streets of the Principality has fuelled dreams in Motorsports for decades. The tight circuit with almost no overtaking opportunities is extremely hard to master, and for some drivers winning the Monaco Grand Prix is even more prestigious than winning the World Championship.

Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya
The Formula 1 teams are no strangers to the Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya (formerly known as the Circuit de Catalunya); not only have they raced there every year since 1991, they also conduct extensive testing at the venue.

Familiarity does not, however, lessen the challenge for car or driver. Barcelona’s mix of high- and low-speed corners, plus its abrasive and rather bumpy track surface, makes for a physically and mechanically taxing race.

Tyre wear is particularly high and the varying winds that cut across the circuit mean an optimum set-up can be hard to find. For spectators Turn 1 (also known as Elf corner) is among the best places to watch, as it is one of the track’s few overtaking opportunities. For the drivers it is the final two turns, known collectively as New Holland, which provide one of the biggest challenges of the season. A fast exit is essential in order to maximise speed down the start-finish straight into Elf.

Abu Dhabi – Yas Marina Circuit

To follow…

Posted in Formula 1.